SYLLABUS

Introduction to the Humanities I

Hum A211 section 602 - Fall 2013

William Jamison Instructor

THEME: Integrated exploration of fundamental principles of literature, music, philosophy, and visual arts.

Course Description:
Explores how the arts can provide insight into human experience, and how our knowledge of human experience can provide insight into the arts.  Introduces humanistic methods of inquiry and analysis by examining examples of the arts representative of a range of world cultures and individual artists.  Considers the significance of variations in aesthetic form. Investigates the meaning of specific works of art. Analyzes values implicit in specific works of art and their relationship to larger value systems.

Assumed Knowledge: This course is a writing intensive course which explores multiple artistic media. English 111 and a Fine Arts GER are strongly recommended as preparation for this course.

TEXTS:

The Arts/World Themes by Geraldine Nagle (AWT)

Cover image for ARTS:WORLD THEMES
REQUIRED 

ARTS:WORLD THEMES

Author NAGLE
ISBN 9780697120489

 

Writing About the Humanities, Second Edition by Robert DiYanni (Paperback) (WH)

Cover image for WRITING ABOUT THE HUMANITIES
REQUIRED 

WRITING ABOUT THE HUMANITIES

Author DIYANNI
ISBN 9780136151418

 

Optional: Romeo and Juliet William Shakespeare, any edition is fine.  (If you really don't want to buy  this  book you can find it free on-line.)

CLASS: Hours: Monday 5:30P 8:15P

Rooms: SSB 251

OFFICE: Monday 3:30 - 5:10 P Administration and Humanities Building Philosophy Department Room 277 or by appointment. My main office is in Eagle River Center 238C. Here is my Current Schedule.

Phone: 786-4458 (office), 694-1023 (home). The best way to get a message to me is via e-mail. Please feel free to call my home phone. My web page is located at http://wsjamison.uaa.alaska.edu and my e-mail address is wsjamison@UAA.ALASKA.EDU. Please become familiar with the links from this syllabus to lecture notes and other sources for many of the topics we will discuss.

Course grades are based on:

 Writing Assignments - 50% - nine essays showing an understanding of the materials covered in class and the assigned readings in response to questions, each with a minimum of 300 words,

 25% of the grade will be based on a term project. 

 Attendance  -15%.

 Dialogue  -10%.

August 26:

This lecture includes an introduction to the course and description of course requirements. We will discuss: the purpose of studying the Humanities.

For next class read: AWT Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 to p. 42

September 2: Labor Day Holiday (no classes)

September 9:

First lecture includes a discussion of ideas, literacy, power and paradox, and world journeys in time.

Second lecture includes the Art of the Dead, Religious Art, and Mythical Art.

For next class read: WH Preface and Chapter 1

 

September 16:  

First lecture includes architecture for leisure and the workplace.

Second lecture includes Mythical Art, Portraits, and Society and Culture.

For next class read: WH Chapter 2

First Written Assignment due September 17.

September 23:

First Written Assignment discussed.

Term paper topics due.

First lecture includes Environmental Scenes.

Second lecture includes the Camera Arts.

For next class read: AWT Chapter 2 pp. 42 - 66

September 30:

Second Written Assignment due October 1.

First lecture includes social realism perspectives.

Second lecture includes a look at architecture.

For next class read: WH Chapter 2

October 7:

First lecture includes Architectural Language and begin looking at Music.

For next class read: AWT Chapter 2 pp. 67 - 89

Second Written Assignment discussed.

October 14:

First lecture includes Architectural Language and begin looking at Music.

"Final" term paper topic and tentative bibliography due.

For next class read: AWT Chapter 3 pp. 92 - 119

Third Written Assignment due October 15.

For next class read: WH Chapter 3

October 21:

Third Written Assignment discussed.

First lecture includes Revisiting the Camera Arts and looking at Music.

For next class read: AWT Chapter 4 pp. 191 - 223

October 28:

Term paper thesis statement and outline due.

First lecture includes a discussion of humor.

For next class read: WH Chapter 4

Fourth Written Assignment due October 29.

November 4:

Fourth Written Assignment discussed.

This lecture includes a discussion introducing the topic of Romeo and Juliet

For next class read: Romeo and Juliet Acts 1 and 2

November 6: 7 PM dress rehearsal of Lucia in downtown Anchorage at the PAC (free tickets from me on November 4th courtesy of Kevin Patterson director of the Anchorage Opera).

November 11 class canceled - replaced by attendance on November 6th.

 

Fifth Written Assignment due November 12.

 

November 18:

This lecture includes a discussion of the play so far.

Term paper first rough draft due.

This lecture includes a discussion of the play so far.

For next class read: WH Chapter 5 and Romeo and Juliet Acts 3 and 4

 

Term paper discussion groups assigned, second rough draft due.

For next class read: AWT Chapter 5 pp. 232 - 277 and Romeo and Juliet Act 5

Sixth Written Assignment due November 19

This lecture includes a discussion of the play to the end.

November 25:

Term paper groups present concerns.

Term paper third draft due. This draft will be shared with group.

For next class read: WH Chapter 8

Seventh Written Assignment due November 26.

This lecture includes a discussion of the purpose of the course.

December 2:

For next class read: WH Chapter 9

Class summary and student survey.

Term Paper due.

Eighth Written Assignment due December 3.

 

December 9: No meeting Monday. Final meeting is Wednesday.

 

Ninth Written Assignment due December 10.

December 11: Final meeting is Wednesday 4:00P - 6:45P instead of Monday because of the final schedule. Class meets for the last time from and we will watch uninterrupted the movie "Romeo and Juliet."

Class summary and student survey.

This syllabus may be adjusted at any time to meet the class or instructor’s requirements upon one week’s notice to students. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page is maintained by William S. Jamison. It was last updated August 14, 2012. All links on these pages are either to open source or public domain materials or they are marked with the appropriate copyright information. I frequently check the links I have made to other web sites but each source is responsible for their own content.